Mary Wingo discusses the biological, psychological, sociological and economic affects of stress and what we can do to change things

Podcast Highlights

 

3:57 - Mary Wingo’s Stress Management Background

18:12 - Mary’s Experiences in Writing her book

21:31 - Jungle Medicine

28: 27 - Main Causes of Stress

 

 

Paul

Hey guys and welcome to another episode of My Wellness Wishlist.  We are certainly creeping up on the back end of 2016.  I want to thank you guys for sticking with me for this entire year and the end of last year, it's been a hell of a journey and I couldn't have done it without you, so really muchos appreciatto, which I believe in Spanish is for absolutely nothing but thank you anyway.  Today's Wellness titbit is surrounding stress and the various different biological effects.  This added stress one can have to our daily life stress is one of the main causing factors of insomnia.  Now, I'll tell you right now having dealt with many people throughout every day of my training and guidance I would say approximately fifty to sixty percent of the people that I deal with suffer from some form of sleep-disorder.  Stress also causes chest pain, high cholesterol, cardiac problems, depression and a host of other health-related issues, in fact I would hazard a guest at saying or an educated guess at saying that most causes if not all causes of disease are related to some form of stress. In my education stress directly translates to toxicity in the system if that comes through forms of food, lack of sleep like rest, lack of exercise, detrimental thoughts or any of the above this will directly translate to stress and sickness.  Bringing up families in a highly developed and urbanized city where everyone has to put up with the high cost of living, rising crime rates, traffic congestion, air pollution, all-of-the-above of these very, very stressful external factors will also have a very intimate effect on your internal biology.  This stuff has been measured over and over again and my guest today has done a PhD on this stuff we're very very lucky to have a lady by the name of Mary Wingo on the show today and she pretty much is it when it comes to authorities on Biological stress on your internal self and your external self.  Mary has completed a PhD in north texas in physiology specifically human stress research, the field of study deeply challenged her and fully allowed her to understand human adaptation and its mechanisms required diving in deep to all levels of the biology, ecology, psychology and sociology as well as economics and politics.  Mary's got a lot of research in the psychological elements of stress and the way it manifests as well not just as a single person but in a wider community.  So, this interview is jam-packed full of amazing research that she has done, can't wait for you guys to get stuck into this and let me know what you think.  Hey Mary thank you so much for coming on the show 

 

Mary

Oh thank you for having me Pauly 

 

Paul

Mary, you know we make contact online a couple of weeks ago and your story just had so fascinating I can't wait to get stuck into your background and the choices you've made in life, it’s just, just wonderful just really, really reinforces to me and the people that are listening to this show that everything in life in fact is a choice and we can create our own stresses and balance in life, which is, a which is a really beautiful thing.  Mary you have a background in human physiology in fact you have a PhD in stress management or stress research is, that correct?

 

Mary

Yeah, it’s human, it’s human physiology but it was, I studied like the human-like response.  So, you know it was clinical study 

 

Paul

This is such a fascinating topic to me because stress comes in so many different forms, you can get in the food that you eat, you can get in the environment that you live in, you can get it in obviously the thoughts that you make and create in your head.  How did you start at tackling this enormous issue that is obviously a very prominent issue in developing worlds, how did you start what was the first step in the PhD?

 

Mary

Well, it, like, went back to when I was an undergraduate and back then, you know, stress research was sort of a little bit on that friend, you know, sort oflike the lunatic friends and I mean, what really, it was just starting to come out and I really, enough I mean they're, you know, it has been studied, you know, very in one form or another for like well over a hundred years markup, maybe mark a hundred and fifty years but you know it was always this basically, it's how organisms adapt and we'll just, I'll just talk about human since that's what we're interested in but it's how we adapt as in how we actually change our our biology in order to adapt to whatever environment has to be that happens to be in front of us.  So, it's not just stress and it's not like a good or bad thing, all it is is our adaptive mechanisms and it takes a bit of the, you know, mystery out.  What I basically want people to take home is to be able to, to do risk assessment, to do an accurate risk assessment of the stress in their life because it's probably one of the most riskiest things and that they, you know, that people in a modernized society participate. 

 

Paul

Let me ask you this question, do you believe that, you said that stress is not a positive or a negative thing. That was my next question for you, there are a lot of people that immediately say that stress is the worst thing in the world and to avoid it at all cost.  Do you believe that there is a certain balance of stress that is productive in somebody's life? 

 

Mary

Well, I mean,  we evolve with these mechanisms Pauly and  this is something that’s a lot of folks in general have a hard time getting their head around because see it ultimately comes down to this,  during the stress response and if its operating correctly and helpfully, you know, it's not like abused or mess up, you basically you assume for the duration of the stressor a more plastic stance.  So, you actually change states your whatever tissue that happens to be under stress changes physical states and hopefully it's just this temporary thing and that's what stress is suppose to be, it must be punctuated, it's not supposed to be this chronic thing.  We didn't have bears chasing us, you know, every single moment in caveman, you know, in times it was punctuated.  You know, your kind of laid back, lazing around and then boom, you know, you had, you know, the vigilance and you have to be alert and  take quick action well and then you return to base land, it's not supposed to be this grind of just sitting on annoying traffic or you know tolerating, you know, an unequal hierarchy society, it's what it is, it's basically all about how we adjust or adapt to the demands of whatever the environment has to be around, you know, that we happen to find ourselves in 

 

Paul

I see

 

Mary

So, there's two parts, you've got the actual organism or the human and then you have the influences of the environment.  So, it's, we're taking a lot of this sort of a kind of in that, not well, just you know, is one of those fields of science, it's a little bit nebulous, seems very hard to describe because it’s so vast and what I'm trying to do is just make it a little bit more clear, it's a great topic, very fascinating.

 

Paul

So from a biological standpoint youdiscussed this, you know, the biological need in the past if a bear or a saber-toothed tiger would come and attack a human and the final flight response would ensue, could you break down what actually happens for those of us who don't know what actually does happen in the biological system to that and at how we have kind of now created this artificial environment to have this heighten fight-or-flight response in a more regular fashion perhaps unnecessarily, I’d say.

 

Mary

Yes, okay, okay well I'm going to explain it to you but this is actually a part of sort of the paradigm that sort of emerged after the steadiness or too damn long basically.  So,  okay first of all let me describe a very important person in history and I should say medical history, he's actually one of the fathers of modern medicine and his name is “Hans Selye’.  He’s basically like in the first chapter when they're discussing homeostasis and every, you know, of your first chapter of, you know, freshman biology or you know, anatomy and physiology the homeostasis and what he described what was called the general adaptive syndrome.  Okay and this was back a bazillion years ago this is probably like in the nineteen forties or so maybe late nineteen thirties andhe's like, whatis it, when creatures try to adapt they follow sort of this pattern, this predictable pattern and he stopped at this and  he died like I think in the seventies or eighties and no one really picked it up.  I mean this is like an important part of medicine like how basic functioning works, we're talking vegetative function and no one really picked it up.  Well, of course, you know and being sort of the geek, I was like “Oh god here someone needs to expand on this” because there's been, you know, many tens of thousands of papers published and look that in this round since then  and of course nobody did it.  So and I sort of weigh that and updated framework of the general adaptation syndrome and this is how it goes, okay, so first, you know, for instance you come across a stressor, we’ll just use a bear for instance and you go into what's called the alarm stage, that's the first stage.  The alarm stage  and that's like when you hit the adrenaline, so adrenaline that fight-or-flight, you know, your hearts pounding and hormone, ok, that comes online within seconds, ok so it's a very rapidly acting hormone and it comes and hopefully it goes but, so you be you’re orient, you're like “Oh there's a stressor” well, then as you experience the stress you enter the what's called the resistance stage, which is at this could last from minutes to years, okay, depending on the stressor and what this is, ok, this is basically, you do, if you undergo a healthy stress response this is where the tissue that is under stress does sort of a phase shift and become a little bit more plastic, it becomes plastic so it can figure out how to reconfigure itself in order to adapt to the new environment, so basically okay, so we're using a bear, you know and then we have adrenaline you know aiding us, okay, well then after a period of time we are cortisol, this is probably a few minutes later courtesan comes on a little bit later and it comes up and what it does, it helps with this phase shift, it helps kinda turns us into sort of a gelatinous mess, whatever part of this is most stressed but at the same time, ok, on the cellular level of that, this is really cool, on the cellular level, you know, you have several stress response mechanisms and so this all begins to cellular level.  So, what happensis the cell membrane detects whatever stress or whether it's pressure or heat or it’s getting ripped apart and thenthere are these like really intelligent proteins that are inside and there's several different stress response but they're called chaperones, like intelligent butlers and what they do is all the mayhem and destruction that goes on because of whatever stress response is hitting the cell, they go and they clean it all up.  So, stress is like you're carrying a big load of laundry like you know it's all perfectly folded and then you trip and it falls everywhere on the rim and it's unfolded, well these chaperone proteins are like an intelligent butler, that's like, oh, ok well let me fold this up and put this in this drawer, so things are functioning ok again.  So, it operates with the cortisol to keep kind of this phase shift and how those intelligent butlers rearrange the proteins depends on the stressor and you keep on going and if you don't resolve that stressor, you hit what's called the exhaustion valve, okay.  So you just start to, it's like using a credit card to start to hit your limit and you start to run out of steam and when that happens you start losing tissue function and if you keep on going if you keep on if you don't resolve a stress you will have tissue death and this is where stress related disease express in fact this is where basically all disease comes from and this is in, so basically this is how the stress response work, it’s demystified and how it works is we change of phase shifts and if we don't do it if we don't resolve it fast enough then we just kind of turned into jelly and lose structural integrity and you know, get the problems that we all know that are associated with stress. 

 

Paul

Fascinating it's really interesting, so from what I gather from this explanation, it means that we do have the power to be able to once, this laundry messes ended up on the floor we have the power to be able to, if we can intervene in a conscious manner to be able to recreate at order in a more functional manner as opposed to, you know, at a self-destructive man who is that kind of an option for people here? 

 

Mary

Oh! Well, yeah there is a absolutely personal agency, you know, that we have but then remember we have the environment too so, we can't control the, always, sometimes we can.  There are certain instances that we can but absolutely the big thing that, you  know, people that are interested in high performance and then, you know.  I know this boy, I do exercises writing this book, let me tell you, is you have to understand   that stressors are added, ok?  So if you've taken on like a massive project where  you're going to really be burning the candle at both ends then you basically have to treat yourself  like you're training for the Olympics, ok, you have to watch every aspect of your nutrition rest, emotional relationships.  I mean it's like being a racehorse and he have to really watch all the details because if you just you know we seem to like where you know this being ragged out and over tasks and mentality that didn't exist with our ancestors not too long ago like a badge of honor and actually whatever we gain more in the short run and again we hit tissue exhaustion and a lot of times it ends up especially in the US where health coverage really, isn't there to pay for, it could bankrupt an entire family and we're talking people that can lose and they do lose, you know, a lifetime's worth of savings and could plunge a family into poverty, so this is just a, you want to assess your risk and if you doing something high performance you've got to treat yourself like an athlete.  Remember it's additive you've got to treat yourself like an athlete 

 

Paul

If I could ask you a personal question about the experience in writing this book, which we'll get to later, I'm i'm sure you needed to really, really embark on this project with that understanding that you were pursuing an event or a chapter of your life, where it was going to be a high-performance pursuit, so how did you go about tackling this? 

 

Mary

Oh my god! Well number one I really didn’t want to do it.

 

Paul

 

Did you practice what you preach?

 

Mary

Oh, absolutely I had to

 

Paul

Fantastic

 

Mary

I couldn’t got the book done, I could because the book covers analysis of its huge body of information and I had to hold extreme forms of attention and be readinghuge extensive review articles and you know so I could get the most up-to-date information.  I make sure everything just completely cutting edge up-to-date and Oh My God, I mean I had like ice packs on my eyes because you know I was reading, just gathering, oh so many hours a day, I mean I already knew this, so at least I wasn't going from zero.  I actually didn't want to do it, I was actually waiting for somebody more prestigious and smart to do it and you know, there's  , so many, so many famous researchers insights like why don't you guys do it? Well, obviously and not but where are our modernized societies are sort of in trouble right now.  What I wanted to people to avoid societies are especially in the US and in Europe, so why is a-actually humanitarian crisis and so yeah it took a tremendous chunk out of me I had to exercise extreme discipline and you know I had to, you know, dietary regimen, I mean it’s just like an athlete seriously like an elite athlete doing a marathon and you know, the self-care and even then I'd walk out of my place here onto the streets of cuenca really loopy something, I mean because it really because this is some really heavy stuff and being able to translate it in something that just Joe Average can understand.  Well, that was the second part of it, weren’t just the concepts, it was like having to work with a ton of professionals so it was readable, so that was harder than actually putting together, so it was an enormous, I mean this is a groundbreaking project that really somebody else should attend. 

 

Paul

I don't think so I think

 

Mary

No, no, no honestly, honestly somebody else it’s just a

 

Paul

Look, it sounds like you’ve done an incredible job and work tirelessly at it, can you give us an example of the type of, did you gear your nutrition in your diet towards optimal brain function or was it just a distressed kind of approach to nutrition 

 

Mary

Ok I had or I am, I’m just gonna be straight out honest here.  Ok so it was a combination nutrition and anyone, I mean this I'm just really just you know no process you know, nada, I mean really, really just like really watching nutrition and  really watching the junk which is very easy to do down here and  just a, there's like you know, emotional conflict, toxic relations, oh man that went out the window I literally know energy for that.  Yeah and another thing I want to open up again or, is a  the, well, the jungle medicine that I was exposed to here in the Amazon and was also instrumental as well 

 

Paul

Tell me about that

 

Mary

Well, yeah, there were some other reasons and you know I embarked on some general medicine ceremonies and some completely unrelated reasons and after like, I don't know the third or fourth ceremony, don't ask me but words just started kind of coming out and I mean like, right, like out of my fingertips typing and I've never, I mean I'm a decent writer but I've never been prolific ever in my life ever I mean it was always a pain, you know and decent that is a lot of work and it's just I found myself you know putting together these really elaborate scientific proposals.  I mean I hadn't written anything like that in years I actually been in small business, it’s actually out of science and I'm like all the sudden it's like I've never stopped it.  I mean, it's like I wouldn't even rest it was like putting together like these really professional and technical documents and it was just coming out and I'm like I'm like okay nobody has written this book yet I mean I had it in my mind for many years,  come on, somebody else needs to do this, you know, obviously nobody else is gonna do it and I saw where  the US and Europe were getting and really had trouble and the health systems were becoming very, very strange and it's mostly because of the explosion of stress-related illness becauselet me tell you why, let me tell you why, ok here you have a lot of socialized clinics and hospitals here, you know, low-cost or are free, so pick all right cost isn’ta barrier, well if we in many of these clinics in the U.S. you have lines like 10 miles long, you know, day and night  trying to get just anylevel of care but here I noticed over and I mean I've lived here two and a half years that almost all the time when I go on these clinics and they’d be empty and the doctor, dentist would just be waiting for me or maybe five minutes, you know, it wasn't like the hours and hours like in our culture's that’s way, way, and after just kind of looking like Ecuador is started to sick, they don't need these services, they're not wiring,  well they're not stressed.

 

Paul

What external environmental influences do you think are responsible for that? 

 

Mary

Well, in order to answer that question, we turn to probably the greatest philosopher the 21st century “Nassim Taleb”  and basically he wrote this awesome here are a couple of awesome the one he wrote one book called “BLACKS WANTED” another one called “ANTI FRAGILE” and basically what it is, is that Ecuador is you know, been through hell, it's been there looking like 75 president's for President entities its inception like 1838, I believe, I think that's when they became a republic and they've had like 20 constitutions and 10 forms of baking holidays and soof course it's a, you know, really tranquil right now and then a very you know a very prosperous, a progressive moment now but because they've been through this they have this like genetic distrust for authority, I mean it's like genetic and they protest for everything, I mean there have been so many times I'm just walking through downtown, oh there's a protest, in fact there was a protest this morning that I, you know, oh it was a, it was a lovely indigenous, mostly indigenous folks protesting, they're protesting a mineral mining and then there was like another side group along with them was those women's rights, you know, yay for women, you know and they're always, I mean it's a family affair, they bring their kids grandma's,  I mean it's not like a dangerous thing, the police, you know are, you know, they don't really stop anybody from expressing their opinion and they may even burn something in the street and still as long as like nothing's being like burnt through the ground or anything you can burn whatever in the streetjust keep it contained, okay.  And, I'm, so what appears to be is that the government's like a little bit of afraid of the people, the people have trained the government to be a little bit, you know, nervousand so I don't know, they've got like parallel systems ofcommerce, no black market, which really I mean you know we all have farmers markets and stuff like that, it just expanded version and so you know these are systems that protect the people when the government fails, you know during the many times they've got and they've got social capital, Oh they've got solidarity, solidarity that you wouldn’t even believe during that earthquake, oh my gosh, the solidarity, I mean the organization was a parallel that of like say of Switzerland have done it, I mean it was just, it was amazing watching the Ecuadorians just come together and yeah these type of things and you know along with you know usually a better diet and better you know it a few other things result in what I believe what my experience is much less stress besides its not just here it's in many parts of South America, you know, many parts of Asia, Africa

 

Paul

And what do you believe is the fundamental or the the main causes around the manifestation of stress in developed nations like the US and in certain countries in Europe, even Australia there's a tremendous amount of perceived stress around as well 

 

Mary

Oh, absolutely and absolutely you guys are not immune either, ok there's actually five and this is going to really clarify a lot of things, kind of sort of on itdeep existential level for your viewers, ok so number one and it's sort of like this blanket sort of category called complexity and what I mean by complexity is actually the over taxation of of your working memory and executive functioning and what I mean by that I mean like the fatiguing of the functioning of your frontal lobes and the lobes are right here and also behind your eyes and now a lot of folks think that this say the sympathetic nervous system and the adrenals are the basic stress organs that straight you know mechanism, no your primary stress organ is your friend aswell and the reason why it evolved is and gave us the competitive advantage during evolution is it allowed us the ability to attenuate our stress through planning and following through and having concentration, you know the stuff that we associate with having, you know, good mental clarity, right?

 

Paul

Yes

 

Mary

And emotional regulation as well and so, okay, so a little bit of stress kind of jump start it and get too creative and, you know, its juices flowing but as the cortisol remains elevated over a period of months to years, fatigue sets in and in order to conserve energy because it's not like it runs your, I mean it's not like it, you know, operates your vegetative functions or anything like that it's basically a rational thought, you know.  So I mean it's actually a not an essential need for core life functions, so it's one of the first things to go offline when you're under stress and sure enough it does have a special special set of reach of receptors that mediate this.  So, I mean this explains, I mean this is why mental illness develops, this is, mental illness is it comes about through and for whatever reasons.  We are overthinking, over-scheduling, multi-tasking, just pressing too much, always messing with something, thinking, cognitive loading, all the time and we're not.  I mean, this is part of our culture we, I know I used to wear it as a badge of honor, you know, and late honestly it ends up costing you the hell of a lot more in the long run, whether it's through disability, mental illness, loss of opportunity because you just can't keep concentration, you know, you end up losing lots, ok that's number one.

 

Paul

Go for 

 

Mary

Number two, number two is unequal society, living in an unequal society, so basically if we understand stress response to be a phase stay, a phrase transition, if you're at the bottom of a heat, okay the guy at the top can finagle his way out of a lot of stressful  experiences, he can have minions do that.  With your guy at the bottom, I mean you've got the worst access to jobs, schedules of jobs, to healthcare, your public transport, I mean,  you know, housing, you get the worst of everything.  So, basically you have to maintain a more plastic state in order to deal with the constant ravages of the environment, you're just always having to be vigilant and keeping that state again specially for men and at the bottom of a totem pole results in an explosion of stress-related illness disability and a early death.  So, yeah, uh huh, so this is the reason why revolutions come about its because you have hundreds of thousands, if not millions, if not tens of millions, if not under the millions of people under and immense stress, you know because they're basically fighting for their life and that's what revolution is about, you don't, I would undertake revolution with everything that you go unicorn, you know, happy and you take it when like, oh my god, Am I be able to feed my kids, you know and that's when, I see it, I see it in the Ecuadorians, I mean, I didn't, I was part of the occupy movement but I understand this full circle now.  So, we understand when we look at how people work in groups and it herds, you have to look at it through the light of stress so that's how that was.  Number three is sort of a second loss of social capital and that's what a lot of folks down here in South America have make good solid social networks and involvement, social political, religious groups and in the modern society this phenomenon has dropped precipitously since the eighteen fifties and so we're often extremely isolated and lonely and this just doesn't exist down here, I mean they're just always socializing, it's like incredible I mean, just to see it and so I'm that there again if you don't have the protection of the group guess what you have to assume that more plastic state and you become again more vulnerable and this is logical, right?  This is why we exist or (inaudible) exist.

 

Paul

What do you suppose the reason is for isolation in modern society? 

 

Mary

Well, okay I can be really, do you want the provocative answer?

 

Paul

Yes of course 

 

Mary

Okay because I actually this took a long time for me to get my head around but ultimately when it comes down to it, if you really, really want to know the nuts and bolts well, I believe because we used to have very cohesive cultures in our societies, I mean our grandparents, I mean, you know, it could explain this and it just kind of disappeared and I believe that when our society became more financialized, ok so when we basically made it, well, not we but the powers that be a structured site society where everything was monetize, ok.  Now, in like societies that don't adopt this view a lot of stuff is not monetized, a lot of stuff is kind of sort of considered part of the public good but then the  way our societies are structured to accumulate capital at the top sort of gave birth to this excessive financialization and with that in order for the folks at the top to make even more money they made everything financialized and with that, you know, in order to generate more money made us more materialistic and with that, if we look at this from a thermodynamic perspective and these are systems becoming more and more and more complicated okay and the more complicated more complex it is the higher the risk, okay, for some sort of catastrophic, you know, catastrophic breakdown.  So, yeah so as we became more prosperous and we became more materialistic and we became more financialized, essentially if you want to really put it down its neoliberal policies and that's what caused the destruction of many parts of our culture, which still remain in other so-called less-developed cultures.

 

Paul

Do you believe that we can live in a, and flourish in a capitalist world or nation at whilst minimizing these stresses?

 

Mary

Well, again a lot of people don't really understand capitalism, see I say yeah, they’re really, really, really a do a meta-analysis to really understand this.  Ok so what is capitalism?  A lot of people don't have a really good idea, capitalism is just isn't like the most, it's just a democratic exchange of goods and services, you know, and it’s very at least in the beginning stages of the capitalism it's very democratic, I mean, I can't think of a, think of a flea market or you know, the farmers market where everyone has the same chance and whoever has the best fruit or whatever, you know, and it's real fair, and everybody, it's real democratic whoever has the best.  Well, as this process evolves over time and this is what Karl Marx, I mean, you know, if you ever study Karl Marx explain is that this process gets contaminated by corruption, you know, there's always gonna be somebody trying to manipulate the system, buy their way out, maybe agood block off, change, you know, supply chains, you know, I mean you know trying to get out of the taxes whatever and and so I don't believe that capitalism in it  of itself is stressful but I do believe when it kind of always, this happens over and over in history, this isn’t anything unique, this way human beings respond under stress, ok and ultimately this system become so corrupt that the people at the bottom, okay this is how revolutions form, right?  They can't make a living, you know, for whatever reasons they're just getting squeezed and squeezed and squeezed because its all this funneling up at the top and competitions getting worse and worse and worse and so the ability to make a profit is getting less and less, less it's always the labor and they get squeezed and so this is where you have the mass stress response and this is where you get the problems that you're seeing exactly today. 

 

Paul

Yes, ok we were on the third point, did you want to move on to the fourth point, I’m not too sure

 

Mary

Yes, yes the 4th point, you know, this is completely different.  You have chemical stress and that comes from trying to adapt to depletion or derangement of the human biome which of course probably a lot of your, of yours as you may know as the little critters that hang in, hang around in our gut and on our skin and in our orifices and one thing a lot of people, they know but they haven't maybe put it together is that these micro organisms have evolved over millions of years along with this and they’re unique to geographical regions and it's like fingerprints and then they get deranged.  You actually lose a big chunk of your physiological function like for instance the ability to produce vitamins, a lot of growth signalling, immune signalling, endocrine signalling, cellular growth signalling.  So, basically we're not just us, how we function is alongside of these commensally organisms and because of our modernized lifestyle of the process food we, chemicals we, consume use the over sanitization, it can go on and on and on, okay.  We have a deranged this because of this our bodies are trying to adapt it's very stressful for try to adapt to loss of physiological function and that causes a lot of problems. 

 

Paul

Ok that makes perfect sense

 

Mary

Oh, yeah absolutely it's very demystified and finally we're getting into just the fifth one, which is just a kind of segways into this is just chemical stressors in general, okay.  So, ok beyond the damage that we know, chemical stress that puts, you know, like being exposed to non-native chemicals that you know were developed by the last hundred fifty maybe 20 years ago.  Well, of course it doesn't take a rocket scientist to deduce that we don't have developed the metabolic machinery to metabolizes, so just like when we deplete our microbiome when we're exposed to these non-native chemicals, whether it's through pollution or through  hygiene products, I mean you just name it, you know, step it didn't exist, you know, a hundred years ago and then our bodies go through a very potent stress response to try to clear these things out and then you know it just goes on and on and on for decades in year, you know, and for many decades and then before you know it and maybe you've got a liver failure, kidney failure, you know what I’m saying? This is how this things manifest, so yeah those are the five major causes of stress in our westernized societies

 

Paul

It's fascinating because so many of those stresses, of things that are people are actively trying to take on board and bring on board because of what the powers that they have told us are good for us, for example wash yourself multiple times a day with all these super hygiene products, eat low-fat foods that are pumped full of laden with sugar, you know, all of these types of scenarios or you know, work but was 9-5 now 8-6 because that's making an honest living, you know, all these 

 

Mary

I would throw in to that in the US that is nothing in the US

 

Paul

Oh, look it amazes me

 

Mary

They work like animals in the US

 

Paul

It amazes me even the the holidays that you guys give it, I mean, I think we work pretty hard in Australia but at least we’re given a hell of a lot more holidays to take off than the US, it's quite incredible but look we're coming up towards the end of the interview, I just want to leave you with a couple of questions if that's okay Mary.  What would you, what would you suggest and recommend that the people that are listening and watching this interview do today that could help create an intimate and a meaningful change in their life for the future? 

 

Mary

Well, we went over this a little bit before it earlier in the interview is to realize that stress is adequate, ok, that if you're gonna, and to understand, okay.  So, I went over with the basic framework of these five, you know, different stressors and so now people, okay, so, Joe Average, I mean average person is not stupid, which person is actually pretty rational and they can look at these five major categories and they can sit down and list every single stressor, I mean, there's no other way, I mean, it's like going on a like a budget, you know, money budget or food diary if you're going on, it's exactly the same thing, ok, so what you have to do is you have to itemize every single one and you might need like your family or therapist, or you know, even a support group or whatever your community, whatever, in order to help you really, you know, itemized this entire, listen and why would you want to do this?  Well its because stress is becoming such a liability in our societies, becoming so expensive especially in the US when you risk the loss of abread winner or you know, they risk disability, I mean, you're really looking at, you know, humanitarian crisis that is actually on top of this and you're seeing it in Europe too, I mean it's rough shape in Europe and so nobody else really has this type offramework of mapped out and it really needs to go out, it really, you know, but that's what you have to it, no magic bullet, to categorize stress as additive.  Oh, another thing and most potent stress is relational stress, so it's not sitting in traffic, it's not being chased by the bear, it's the stresses we have between each other and so that's it that you want to control, you need to control your relational students too. 

 

Paul

Well, I suppose the relationships you have between you know one another and communities can be an amazing and incredible positive to one's life that if it's an effective it can be also tremendous negative 

 

Mary

If you're in a declining society, okay like in the times during the Soviet collapse it can be very toxic, it's a reason to be an immigrant.

 

Paul

Yeah right. Mary I want to thank you once again for taking the time to be on the show 

 

Mary

Ok can I, can I plug my website

 

Paul

Please and your book because I will be putting all of these in the show notes but I'd love for you to have just that spell it out and everything like that, so we can get it on the show notes, thank you, go ahead. 

 

Mary

Ok, thank you, thank you so much for this opportunity, ok so your viewers, if they want, they're gonna want to know more about this and they can go to MaryWingo.com and they can, Igot a ton of free stuff, you know, I got a lot of teaching videos, you can down a download for free, this framework of, you know, like really getting a truly actionable steps and getting true management of your stress, you can download that for free and you can also pick up a copy of my book, which I've made a purposely very affordable, so that basically every community in the world can afford it 

 

Paul

That’s wonderful

 

Mary

You're gonna want to understand more of this, if they want to get ahold of me, I'm available for seminars, workshops, possible coaching and of course a business consulting because this is one of the biggest cost to running a an organization, 

 

Paul

Absolutely without a doubt in this tremendousrise of stress in decline of productivity within corporate workspaces, thank you once again Mary I really do appreciate it, take care have a good, is it morning or after? its the morning there yeah no? 

 

Mary

No it is,  it's nine o'clock

 

Paul

Nine o'clock in the evening, thank you for taking your evening out I appreciate it

 

Mary

Thank you very much Pauly, take care

 

Paul

All right guys another excellent amazing and informative interview from Mary Wingo.  She's a wealth of knowledge when it comes to her chosen topic, I want to thank you once again Mary for jumping on board and being a part of the ever-growing My Wellness Wishlist family.  What a champion, alright guys as I mentioned before, we are coming in on the end of 2016, I want to thank you so much yet again, if you have a friend that you think would benefit from listening to the show, shoot them a link of any episode by, as long as somebody's getting some benefit out of any of these episodes I am just so unbelievably ecstatic to continue this journey and if you could just remember to send through a review it helps so much to spread the word of love and plus I really love reading them, it makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside and that's what it's all about. That's me for yet another week, I shall see you later on in a month, thank you guys.

____________________________________

 

Show Notes

 

MaryWingo.com