Steph Lowe discusses simple and effective ways that nutrition can increase your energy levels and help to lose body fat

Transcription

 

Paul

Hey guys!  Welcome back to My Wellness Wishlist, today’s wellness titbit is surrounding GMO’s, Genetically Modified Organisms.  There’s been a lot of shady talk especially in the United States about what is going on with GMO’s and the corporate involvement in it.  60 to 70% of all processed food in the US contain genetically modified ingredients and in that and in that same country 95% of food producing animals actually eat genetically engineered food and you know what they say, it’s not who you are what you eat, it’s you are what your food eats.  However, there are some countries that are taking a step in the right direction.  64 countries to be exact worldwide require clear GMO labelling on food products that do have genetically engineered food and I’m proud to say that Australia is one of those countries.  Today we have a nutritionist on the show by the name of Steph Lowe, AKA the Natural Nutritionist.  Steph got some excellent ideas surrounding food as a fuel source as well as a very balanced way of maintaining health and vitality for the everyday person throughout your day.  Steph has also taken charge of Sam Wood’s highly successful online 28 minutes in 28 days exercise and nutrition program that has taken the world by storm; I believe it’s called 28 by Sam Wood.  Steph has also written a number of highly successful books including, The Real Food Athlete, Food to fuel athletic performance is really a priority for Steph and her business.  She’s really good at it and she has some incredible things to say about how food can give and real food can give athletes the competitive edge.  Sit back and have a listen to Steph Lowe discuss the very many intricacies of nutrition, please enjoy.  Hey, Steph how are you doing? 

 

Steph

Good, thank you

 

Paul

Thank You for coming down at to your place for take 2 of our middle discussion, I appreciate it.

 

Steph

No problems at all

 

Paul

We encountered some minor technical difficulties but we’re all good now crystal, crystal clear

 

Steph

Awesome

 

Paul

Steph, you are a sports nutritionist and you have an abundance of knowledge that I can’t wait for you to share with my audience.  I just want to have a quick discussion about what nutrition actually means to you.

 

Steph

Yes for sure, so we focus on real food and we’re really big on changing the way people see food but really about breaking the myth that we have had in the nutrition world for the last 5 decades.  So I feel like our big passion or our purpose for the last 5 years has been to change that education and as you probably see there has been a huge real food movement, which I think is amazing but it’s just us having that conversation with those that haven’t yet heard it and really just changed the way the developed world eats.

 

Paul

What would you say had been the major differences in the last five to eight years the education around food and what people know positive eating habits to be

 

Steph

I think the biggest change has actually been the appreciation of physiology.  I think we once had a very reductionistic view of food it was calories in and calories out and that was kind of it whereas now the nutrition world is really holistic, which is amazing and we know that the answer to health and wellness is definitely not to east less and move more so the physiology and the effect that food has on our body is where people are really starting to I guess direct their interests and were research is really thriving and that’s pretty simple when you understand it but it was lost for a very long time because of what happened to the transition world 50 years ago. 

 

Paul

Let’s talk about that

 

Steph

Yes, I think the biggest, I guess the culprit, the research that we can sort of the link to the study and so keys, so there was a study called the 7 countries study where correlation was made between saturated fat consumption and heart disease and that’s what we know is there’s saturated fat hard health myth but it was the catalyst for the low fat era because we thought for such a long time that these natural whole foods would kill us.  And then we saw the agriculture industry dominate so we have a very high carbohydrate, very highly refined carbohydrate diet of the food pyramid and the government guidelines where, that way and we saw these multi trillion dollar industry that is low fats and so that’s really where the problems have been.

 

 Paul

I find it fascinating what the motivation was surrounding those studies 50 years ago and how it actually bought about an entire industry of people that were obsessed with being thin yet growing fat by the day, it was so fascinating and from what I understand concurrently at the same time there was another study going on about sugar consumption over in England.  I figured the name of the doctor who actually conducted the study but it seems that the big marketing dollars where surrounding as our case and his studies and from what I also understand the actual results that came out from that study required selective in given that he may have selected certain countries that supported his argument

 

Steph

Oh yes, I mean the actual number of studies that he originally examine where like 3 folds, so he picked 7 to support his hypothesis and science was very elementary back then, correlation did equal causation unfortunately so there was just this link, which led us to as what you say that the nutrition world and the crazy low fat era that we saw last but basically up until last year, I believe that 2015 was the death of the low fat era but that’s a long time of indoctrination and for a lot of people even today really challenging to unlearn

 

Paul

Totally, you know, I mean hind site it’s 2020 and given the ability to be able to look back on the last 50 years and see I guess the wake of sickness and disease that has actually existed with this fixation of low fat diet, that’s in high sugar diets, it’s incredible to, you kind of want to kind of, you know, do this one to yourselves  but we’re here now and we’re thriving on real foods and it’s a wonderful thing.  I want to switch gears a little bit and actually move in to the sports nutrition that you are an authority in, I want to throw a few different scenarios at you and just kind of give my audience understanding of how you would offer nutritional advice to various different sports.  If you would offer advice to an insurance athlete at a long distance cyclist or an opposing example of a power lifter or a weight lifter, how would you advice these 2 differently?

 

Steph

So, firstly we look at the energy system that the athlete uses the most in their training.  It got to be out to match up the training program and with the nutrition program they got to go hand in hand and they should.  So, an endurance athlete is a fantastic example because what we do with an endurance athlete is their difference to our guidelines and because of the energy systems so an endurance athlete should be doing 80% of their training aerobically, so in the aerobic zone and that zone is fuelled on fat if the carbohydrates are controlled.  So, we want to emphasize that for a number of reasons I’m sure will discuss and in order to optimize that metabolism we need to manage one hour carbohydrate in taken to our stress but on the topic of food an endurance athlete actually needs a lot less carbohydrate than we’ve been led to believe and certainly in comparison to let’s say what a conventional sports dietician would advice, they need a lot less than carbohydrates because they should be burning fat in the <inaudible> sessions.  You know, I think they still need whole food carbohydrates don’t get me wrong but it’s all about when and how much whereas a power lifter is doing a lot of un-aerobic training they’d be using a lot more muscle glycogen for fuel.  They’re not really burning a lot of fat when they’re lifting heavy, right?  So, they have a higher carbohydrate requirements, that’s pretty simple physiology in my eyes, we look at what they’re using as their petrol, essentially and they need to be replenishing with 10 hours sleep keeping up with the demands of the session they still don’t need food pyramid carbohydrates obviously because one they’re refined and 2 it’s sex hundred grams a day, which would give anyone the metabolic pathway to diabetes almost.  So it’s obviously whole food carbohydrates. 

 

Paul

Hence, the epidemic that we are currently existing in

 

Steph

Oh Yes.

 

Paul

Can we talk about how the paradigm have shifted to endurance athletes actually gaining energy  predominantly from fat as oppose to the old school understanding that they got it from carbohydrates.  How is the science changed? 

 

Steph

The science hasn’t changed.  The whole optimizing your metabolism to be effective has been around for forty years or more but that was hidden by the influence of industry so we only look at the major sponsors of say the sports that isn’t association to see that its company’s lack Nestle and Coca-Cola and these are accompanied to the funding the research.  So, I guess that we say that actually the correct research is hidden under the table and then we saw this influence of industry and these multi-million dollar companies that of course wanted us to need to drink Gatorade and to fuel on their products and we turn all our athletes into sugar burners who could no longer access fat for fuel.  That’s what sugar does right?  It’s a very simple molecule it’s always going to be preference over fat in its presence.  So when we’re relying on our monthly food pyramid guidelines to sports using guidelines, we’re all sugar burners

 

Paul

I understand

 

Steph

So that’s what happened in the last 40 years but I think what really changed in the last 4 or 5 is that people aren’t being brain washed anymore.  An average consumer has really great knowledge and know how to read a label, often they have a very good understanding of the basic level of physiology and the sugar movement’s huge, athletes can’t be led to believe that refined sugar is going to help their performance very much at all and hopefully for not much longer. 

 

Paul

Yes you’re absolutely right, I mean the access to information across the board is just kind of explode everywhere and people are they’re getting hit to the understanding of perhaps ulterior motives of logical operations and it’s good to see that people like you are flying the flag of correct science that is going to fuel our body’s and make us healthier and avoid these crippling diseases that so many people, like my father who has diabetes and everyday I tried to educate him about what to do but it does become increasingly difficult once you have, my father’s 65 years old and he’s lived his life a certain way for many, many decades to be able to tell somebody this is not the right way, hey it’s like, and all the person becomes critical of new things.  So, how would you approach somebody in my father’s situation whose a 65 year old man who works many hours at his desk and does exercise but needs to change his eating habits from eating bread 2 to 3 times a day to switching that food pyramid up?

 

Steph

Does your dad have type 2 diabetes?  So, I think it’s him understanding the physiology because I believe that LCHS, lower carbohydrate high fat saturation should be the first line of treatment to type 2 diabetes.  One of the big problems we had in Australia though is the diabetes educators are given that government information that we’ve been telling about so the diabetes educators are telling these people they need to eat carbohydrates and manage their blood sugar with insulin, which when you really think about it is ridiculous because if we put out the culprit food we don’t need pharmaceutical intervention eventually for someone that’s very unwell <metabolically> it could be.  So, if your dad understands what carbohydrates are doing to his body and that they are the reason that he is insulin dependent and if they are no longer there that he can hopefully manage his own physiology to me that’s really powerful because nobody wants to be on medication

 

Paul

No one does and I feel that unfortunately a lot of people in very influential positions that will tell those that are insulin dependent that there’s no way to turn back from that scenario.

 

Steph

That rubbish, we see that interestingly in the endurance world there’s a famous professor whose a big idol of mine, Tim Notes.  He wrote the law of running and there was a massive chapter on carbohydrate is being the God athletes and carbohydrate loading with the past to party and the really unfortunate irony was that the posted child of carbohydrates gave himself type 2 diabetes and it was fat and he’s running with the polling and he was really, really unwell.  When he took a moment to understand the science and actually appreciate the physiology and the negative impacts that excess refined carbohydrates can have, he literally reversed his disease.  He still needs a very small amount of insulin unfortunately because he was so far down the track like he was very metabolically disfunctioning but you know there are plenty of people that totally get off insulin, I bet they need on LCHS pretty much for life because the carbohydrate intolerance is so high

 

Paul

So let’s some somebody in my father’s position, sorry to pick on you dad but it’s for your own good.  Let’s say somebody in my fathers position understand theoretically within the mind what is going on now.  He’s got these many decades rituals and process that he has acted subsequently in a certain way.  How would you go about introducing certain practices to slowly change his habits? 

 

Steph

Yes I think the biggest culprit is breakfast because notoriously his generation, our generation we eat cereal and rice for breakfast right?  Food comes out of the box right?  Wrong.  So, we change breakfast we get them eating foods that are from an animal or a tree or out of the ground naturally that significantly low carbohydrate right?  So, naturally they start the day with fairly good <inaudible> blood sugar control.  So, when they’ve got the control over the blood sugar roller coaster they have the control over their physiology.  So, they actually change what they want next, you know the blod sugar roller coaster, what goes up must come down and for these people they need more carbohydrates or it’s sugar or it’s caffeine or it’s all of the above and that vicious cycle goes 24/7.  So, when we change breakfast we get a nice stable blood sugar, people experience satiety for maybe the first time in theirlives and they want naturally lower carbohydrate choices and they don’t have that 3:30 slump when they want chocolate or their, you know in high in me office lowly jar, breakfast is the biggest one

 

Paul

Yup, makes perfect sense I mean it sets the platform for the rest of the day and the rhythm

 

Steph

For sure but the thing is I didn’t tell my clients they can have eggs and bacon and vegetables provided what we’re talking about quality of course and then they think I’m crazy because fat kills you right?  So, then we got this other dish that we’re dealing with to really breakdown and I think our father’s generation have it probably the most challenging because daddy only knows low fat.  That’s all they know, their parents would have eaten lard and real food and they were around before the industrial revolution and the prevalence of the agriculture industry and we always say “don’t eat anything what your great grand mother would’ve ate”, so it’s that middle generation that are challenged the most but when someone can understand what real food is I see light bulbs, I see people suddenly realizing that food does not come out of a box or a packet and it certainly doesn’t have a mascot

 

Paul

Yes you’re absolutely right and I suppose the abundance of access that we have right now to fresh fruit and farmers market I know where you and I live we have a farmers market every single weekend it pops up we can get organically grown fruit and vegetables, free range meat, free range eggs, we’re actually really, really spoiled for choice and I’ve got a feeling it is the same place in the a lot of places around the world it’s just about people tapping in and having the ability to or the interest in accessing it

 

Steph

Yes I think it’s also why do we need to go to the supermarket?  Why do we need to support companies that don’t care about our health?  I’m sorry but colds and safe way don’t care about the quality of the food and they infected that has on our body whereas farmers who prioritize grass fed pasteurize hormone free like sustainability, that’s who I want my money to, that’s who I want to give my money to, you know, and I think that’s also a great cost saving strategy.  I dislike the real food is expensive argument because I think that’s lazy because there are some amazing strategies that you can start to help the budget and you know grass fed meats from colds is fifty bucks a kilo, that’s not sustainable on your back pocket whereas when you purchase from a farm its 17 dollars a kilo, it’s actually crazy in terms of cost saving strategies. 

 

Paul

Could you give us few strategies of how, if one was about to step into the grassfed, homegrown, organic industry and they wanted to start slowly introducing those types of foods into their diet, how would you go about introducing this in a budgetary way? 

 

Steph 

Yes I think that shopping from a farm is the biggest one because you can pay in bulks so you need a little bit of cash to start and some freezer space, as I’ve said it’s 17 dollars a kilo rather than 50 or more so you can buy a family pack of grass fed meat keep some in the freezer when it’s often <cry-a-vac> so lot can go in the fridge for the first couple of weeks, then you don’t even need to go to the supermarket, right?  And you got your meats for months.  So you’re saving months on shopping and you leave <inaudible>, actually days, hundreds, so it’s also I think though wrapped up in that is the prioritization of your food and the food preparation because too many people think about dinner at 7:30 on their way home, so what’s open it’s either tafe way or it’s cold right?  So when you apply some foresight like you do the training, you apply some foresight to your meal planning and to your structure, your week and how you’re going to eat well around that structure then you can save money because you’re organized.  But the organic conversation is interesting as well I think we can go a little bit too far with organic then I think then that can be quite overwhelming to people as well whereas, we know fruit and vegetables generally vegetables and fruit that has a skin like something like a banana or an avocado that you don’t consume there once that don’t necessarily need to be purchased or organic because they’re protected from chemicals they used in the farming, there is spinach or things that grow straight out of the ground.  We want to try this or purchase organic for those food because they’re in direct contact with what’s being used

 

Paul

I believe that the clean 15 and the dirty dozen

 

Steph

2 thousand, yes

 

Paul

To listed are very, very cool.  I actually might put them on the show notes so it’s a reference point for people to check out.  It’s a wonderful entry level point for people to really start living their lives with little bit awareness and health. 

 

Steph

Yes, absolutely  

 

Paul

When it comes to supplementing sports and I guess an everyday gym goer how would you recommend obviously it’s going to be in an individual basis but if a person comes in and let’s say they train 3-4 days a week there over regular health, do you have a kind of a go to plan of a base level nutritional support system that you would offer somebody? 

 

Steph

So we do pathology testing

 

Paul

Ok great let’s get in to it

 

Steph

So we do pathology testing to any of our clients that want to, so some supplements can come up with the conversation like someone sleeping probably we might recommend a practitioner grade magnesium or something really simple like that but the vast majority will come from blood test analysis.  So, one of the interesting things about our pathology system in Australia is that the guidelines or the reference ranges are very archaic and have been developed from the people that goes to doctors over the years who was sick right?  So, our reference ranges are not, what? An athlete or a person who is trying to optimize then health should strive for so I have a very different way of analyzing results based on the individuals goals and we start with food recommendations of course and lifestyle changes where possible and then supplementations if we need. 

 

Paul

Wonderful, so tell me about this blood typing scenario, how long does it take to get your stuff analyzed and what is it that you actually do analyze within the blood? 

 

Steph

Yes for sure, so what we really need to start with is a GP that’s going to come to the party because the medicare system in Australia is a old so a little bit challenging.  Doctors are really been questioned by medicares to why they are approving free tests so a little bit tricky to try and find someone that is willing to refer for all of the test that we would like but there are also some amazing integrated GP or we’re <inaudible> these days that appreciate the importance of optimizing pathology so I just usually have collaborations on networks that I refer to these days.  So yes, it starts with a GP, the bloods get taken and results are back within a couple of days and then passed on to me and I usually do it prior to the athlete’s next consultation so that we can allocate sometime for me to take them through their results and what the goal is and how they got in to do that, so we do lots, and lots of blood testing but some of them really key ones that we look out isthe inflammatory markers so of course we look at our bloodly food profile.  Now, we’re not looking for totally high cholesterol as we know but it’s looking for low or less than one for try to survives and the big long term help marker is now the total cholesterol takes the L ratio we lessen 3.5 is ideal, there’s 3 more key inflammatory markers that we look at as well just to see RP home assisting and had a memory blank, it’ll come to me in a second and we want obviously control information because that’s the enemy for an athlete’s performance and recovery so we look at where the baseline, level of information is and how we can obviously look at real food to control that and anything else that’s needed on top.

 

Paul

A lot of the listeners are going to know a lot about good and bad cholesterol but for those that don’t actually, I’m preview to it, do you want to break that down because that is also part of, you know the fat myth that we’ve been talking about

 

Steph

Oh absolutely, yes it’s the saturated fat.  So, it’s the saturated fat heart health myth and it’s a total cholesterol heart health myth, so for very long time total cholesterol was seen as the pillar of all health.  So, if you had high cholesterol it was assumed that basically you’re going to die from heart attack and again it was very reductionist in it’s thinking because there are 2 types of cholesterol, there’s obviously our HTL’s and our LDL’s and sort of more recently that was looked back as being, you know, simplified as HTL good and LDL bad but again that’s even too simple we don’t look at cholesterol on it’s own as being good or bad, what science now shows is it’s actually LDL’s sub fraction that is really important.  So, we want our LDL sub fractions to be big and fluffy rather than small and dense because the small dense LDL particles carries the plaque around the body and that can contribute to cardiovascular disease risk but that’s why I refer to the total cholesterol to HTL ratio.  It’s awesome because anyone can calculate it, you just get your total cholesterol divide it by HTL in less then 3.5 is ideal.  What’s even more amazing is that modern labs are now using that on their pathology report so you’ll actually get that ratio and we can use that instead of looking total cholesterol on its own.  That gives you an indication of LDL particle size, that was less than 3.5 we’ve got the small lovely fluffy particles, if it’s 5 and above it’s starting to be the small dense dangerous plaque carrying particles and we need to examine disease risk

 

Paul

Okay, I see, that gives a good amount of insight to the cholesterol so not all cholesterol is bad, is that what we are saying? 

 

Steph

Yes absolutely and that was a really tight summary but I think, it can actually can be that this message is that total cholesterol on its own is not the problem and anyone that uses like any practitioner that uses TC total cholesterol on its own is actually 30 years out of date.  It’s absolutely crazy to that’s still being perpetuated in modern medicine because people are going to their doctor of absolutely getting the fear of God put in them and then prescribes that in statin drugs, right?  And we know that the statin drugs industry is a trillion dollar industry, that’s really damaging a lot of people’s health and I’m not saying that no one needs statin but they’re grossly over prescribes and it’s not even looking at the correct measurement

 

Paul

Have you seen the film Statin Nation? 

 

Steph

Yes absolutely and I share that to al my clients because it’s also sort of what we’re talking about like your dad’s generation.  Generally speaking that generation really respect their GP so if their GP is saying, “look your cholesterol’s high, you better stop eating that meat’, here prescription, for them it’s hard to really to not almost you know, believe that of course they’re telling the truth so I would obviously educate my client quite differently but then give them some resources so they can empower themselves, maybe share that with heir GP so we can keep this movement continuing

 

Paul

Yes great and look I kind of most of it, I clearly don’t agree with the perspective that a lot of old school GP’s have. I can from that paradigm perspective there’s this wonder drive that’s been pushed by this enormous marketing machines that have said here take this and this will fix this mother issue and all will be good, obviously if you look at it from the very minutiae perspective problem solved but if you look at from a greater holistic perspective it’s bizarre and crazy

 

Steph

Yes particularly when you look at the side effects, you know, I think, one of the big errors that the pharmaceutical industry do is that they look at something very reductionistic and they ignore all the side effects.  So, ok yup statin drugs decrease your cholesterol but what bout the decrease in the CoQ10 the coenzyme Q10, which gives people this muscle pain and the depletion of cholesterol, which you need because your brain is 25% cholesterol.  So, suddenly we see this brain fog or even Alzheimer’s disease developing, I mean that is absolutely preventable because not everyone needs a statin drug, the minority do not the majority. 

 

Paul  

So, what do you eat for breakfast?

 

Steph 

I usually have an omelette with an avocado or like a green based smoothie with just berries for the fruit

 

Paul  

Yum!  And throughout

 

Steph  

Pretty simple

 

Paul  

And throughout the day do you kind of grace eat whenever you’re hungry.  What’s the vibe for steph? 

 

Steph  

Yes, definitely don’t grace like I think another big nutrition myth is that you must eat every 2 hours to speed up your metabolism, I mean that’s a bi product of the carbohydrate when you eat refined carbs you’re starving in 2 hours so of course you’re eating a <inaudible>, right? So, it’s very much connected, which is fascinating.  I eat 3, maybe 4 times a day but always relative to my eating window and I taste this to all my clients, right?  Because everyday is different, if we look at conventional calorie canning plans or even meal plans that I was probably guilty of prescribing back in my personal training days.  What they say is “Paul you need the same thing Mon-Sun and that never changes and how is that even work when poach paul doesn’t train one day and paul might do 2 hours one day and one hour the other day and for our endurance athlete they’re doing 6 hours on another day.  I think we have to periodize our in take relative to our output and we periodize our meal frequency relative to our day if you start early and finish late, there’s more meals in there or is on a Saturday if you’re having a brunch at 11 you might need only 2 meals because your eating window is so short.  So, it’s very <ebs and fluids shnids of grey>.

 

Paul  

Yes, right, look one thing I’ve also felt as being so beneficial for my own eating is since my meditation has become more prominent in my life just simple self awareness being able to kind of tap in to my body and say “what is my body need right now?”, as oppose to like yes you can go down the path of intellectualizing things absolutely but just by actually feeling your body and saying “does my body need fuel right now or am I ok, do I need some water, am I thirsty?”

 

Steph  

Yes and we teach our clients to enjoy this but then we always have the person that’s like all my body told I needed a buffalo bill, right?  So, a buffalo bill or a mars bar or whatever it might be, so yes of course it’s about listening to your body and I think that, am I hungry is actually a good conversation to have because one thirst is often mistaken for hunger, and 2 eating is so emotional we use it because we’re procrastinating it’s not black and white nutrition and everyone’s got quite a complex relationship with food but also you know the decrease meal frequency like the 3 meals a day for a lot of people is crazy overwhelming like people fall of their chair when I say, you know it’s only necessary to eat 3 times a day and they think I’m completely nuts and I get it like I’ve been in the nutrition world for long, long time and I had an interest in as long as I can remember.  So, I’m seeing all the fads and myths and the evolution of the industry but again we’re coming back to physiology and I’m not a palaeontologist but I think our ancestors can teach us quite a lot.  Do they have a music bar in their bag?  Or do they eat every 90 minutes or 2 hours?  There were periods of famine and periods of more carbohydrates and different foods and seasonal eating and they thrived, they didn’t have diabetes, right? 

 

Paul

Spot on, spot on.

 

Steph 

So it’s really interesting so sort of break down those myths and you know like what I’ve said to you about like your father when the individual has that life bowl and they actually understand that maybe they got myth of the wrong thing and there’s another way.  That’s where the change happens

 

Paul

Steph you’ve been working very closely with Sam Wood recently on his online program and how is that been for you to communicate your philosophy is to such a wide audience and particularly going from one on one consultation to being able to communicate your message to the masses

 

Steph

Yes, I mean it’s been amazing, it’s been a fantastic opportunity and one I’m very grateful for.  28 years is an absolutely amazing program and the reasons are 10 fold but where it excels you know, it’s largely fat loss although it has a strength set stream, it is still mostly let the people that are looking to manage their weight and it doesn’t involve calorie counting, funny that.  People learn how to eat real food and there are snack recommendations but again we are to educate them on exactly what we’re talking about, ifyou don’t need to snack, don’t snack and for the first time in a lot of people’s lives they are full, right?  They’ve got this magic <set tire sheer> that is provided because of the nutrient density and the macronutrient choices in their meals and they all know that, which is what I love as well as a huge education elements, they’re not just like alright let me eat this, this and this, they understand like they all know that if you’re doing fat loss it’s lower carbohydrate to teach your body to burn fat as fuel.  They know that the strength program is slightly high in carbohydrate because they’re doing more high intensity training and they don’t have fat loss goals, so again it’s the individualization on goals.  So we almost can individualize it, I mean obviously it’s got thousands of members per month, so there’s inherent challenges with that for everybody but then they comes as anyone if wanted we can address that as well.

 

Paul

Fantastic

 

Steph 

So it’s the best of both worlds.  I love that it’s not calorie counting and it works, the results are out of this world and I think even all of us is surprised as we have the results are, it’s amazing

 

Paul  

So good, so very good and I’ve noticed that you’ve got book yourself that is really driving ahead and making such an impact.

 

Steph  

We had the official launch on Wednesday

 

Paul  

Oh how it’s starting?

 

Steph 

Yes, that was fun and part of other time this goes to air the book will be available online. So it’s called the Real Food Athletes and it’s basically a really lovely summary that you and I being discussing and certainly a product of the work that that we’ve been doing at the natural nutritionist for the last five years.  Obviously about real food you don’t have to optimize your performance recovery that adaptation and athletic long jeopardy and it’s got a whole collection of real food recipes that are all served on the plate, you know, 20 or 30 minutes, very simple options to people who are learning about how to eat real food and certainly something that anyone that even people who think that don’t cook can make.

 

Paul  

Love it, love it. Steph where can people find you online?  You’ve got such a world of knowledge, when people want to be able to touch base and reach out to you how can they get a hold of you?

 

Steph 

Yes, for sure so my online home is TheNaturalNutritionist.com.au and that’s where you can also order “The Real Food Athlete” at forward slash at real food athlete, obviously those tings will be at the show notes.  We have quite a real presence on social media so facebook and instagram is both underneath the natural nutritionist and twitter as well is nat nutritionist. 

 

Paul

So very cool, thank you so much Steph for coming on the show it’s been so wonderful

 

Steph  

Pleasure it was awesome to chat and love to speak with you again soon

 

Paul 

Awesome, thanks again Steph.  There you go guys Steph Lowe offering her words of wisdom about human performance when it comes to nutrition and much more.  I’ve been continuing with my yoga challenge on almost the daily basis the weekends are been a bit relaxed about my practice let’s cut but you know, I’m getting in a good 5 to 6 days a week and I’m really feeling the benefits not only am I feeling a lot more limbo but I’m also feeling a lot more tuned out in the head it happens to be a particularly chaotic time in my life with a lot going on and yoga is really helping to gain perspective and just deal with individual tasks as they come up that brings us to the end of yet another week guys, if you’re enjoying what you’re listening to please, jump on itunes, write and review my wellness wishlist, it helps to get the word out to the community about living life with awareness intent and hopefully trying to make changes that can benefit yourself and people around you.  Let’s meet for another week guys, enjoy and I shall see you next week.